Legal Agreement In A Sentence

The purpose of this series of articles is to explain the meaning of the words often contained in treaties and other documents in English law. This phrase often appears in treatises, but can be quite difficult to understand because it has two different meanings. First, ”subject to” is used to express a conditional sentence, z.B. in the following ”term” clause of a distribution contract: Anglo-English agreement, borrowed from the Anglo-French agreement, approval, to the agreement ”to ask to consent” – in the example above, the phrase ”provided” means ”but” to compare the normal rule of one day a week in London with the right of the company to extend the work. Apart from ambiguity, as most people bind ”provided” with ”if,” the use of that phrase as an exception to a main rule means that the sentence will be extremely long and difficult to read. It would be better to delete ”this” and insert a complete stop after the words ”one day a week in London” so that there are two sentences. It is necessary to know how and when general legal terms such as ”provided” or ”deem” are used correctly when writing a document in legal English. Organizing a legal English course will help you better understand this specific terminology and provide you with the skills to write competently in legal English. The passive voice reverses the natural and active order of English phrases. In the passive example below, the recipient of the action passes in front of the actor.

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia Article on Accord These sets of examples are automatically selected from different online sources of information to reflect the current use of the word ”agreement.” The opinions expressed in the examples do not reflect the views of Merriam-Webster or its publishers. Send us comments. Here, the term ”provided” can be replaced with ”if” or ”on the condition that.” The second meaning of ”provided” refers to an exception to a main rule. The use of an employment contract can be illustrated by the ”Place of Work” clause below. 7. Avoid using exceptions. If possible, direct a rule or category instead of describing that rule or category by specifying its exceptions. DON`T SAY: Everyone except people 18 and older… SAY: Anyone under the age of 18 must… However, you can use an exception if it avoids a long and tedious list or a detailed description. If you use an exception, first indicate the rule or category, and then indicate their exception.

DON`T SAY: Alabama, Alaska,… and Wyoming (a list of 47 states) must ration… All states except Texas, New Mexico and Arizona must ration…