Sudan Peace Agreement

Lieutenant General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo signed the document on behalf of the Sudanese government [Akuot Chol/AFP]Two powerful rebel groups – the Sudan Liberation Movement (SLM), led by Abdelwahid Mohamed al-Nour and the Sudan People Movement-North (SPLM-N), led by Abdelaziz al-Hilu, have not signed, however, reflecting the challenges still facing the peace process. On 31 August 2020, a comprehensive peace agreement was signed between the Sovereignty Council and the SRF, comprising the SPLM-N (Minnawi) and JEM for the Darfur line and the SPLM-N (Agar) for the two-zone line. [18] [14] Under the terms of the agreement, the political groups that have signed are entitled to three seats in the Sovereignty Council, a total of five ministers in the transitional cabinet and a quarter of the seats in the transitional legislation. At the regional level, signatories have between 30 and 40 percent of the seats in the transitional laws of their home states or regions. [35] [36] The third round of negotiations began in mid-December 2019 in Juba[9], after it was scheduled to start on 21 November 2019. [10] The round of negotiations was delayed by several weeks due to ”the commitment of some armed movements to participate in workshops related to the peace process,” according to South Sudanese mediator Tut Galwak. [28] The Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC) agreed with the SRF to postpone the creation of the Transitional Legislative Council until December 31 in order to give the SRF, splm-N (al-Hilu) and the government time to reach an agreement before the creation of the Legislative Council. [28] Sudan Peace Agreement signed in Juba on October 3, 2020. The agreement includes eight protocols, of which[5]: regardless of this, the first Darfur-track meeting between representatives of the SRF and the South Sudanese-mediated Sovereign Council was concluded on the 18th, during which a joint committee was established. The Joint Committee declared its intention to review the Juba Declaration of 11 September and to propose how to move from confidence-building measures to negotiations on key issues. [7] On October 21, el-Hadi Idris signed, on behalf of the SRF and Hemetti, on behalf of the Sovereignty Council, a political agreement (sometimes complacent by a South Sudanese mediator), a new ceasefire, the delivery of humanitarian aid by government authorities to conflict zones, and the obligation to continue negotiations. [8] The peace process in Sudan consists of meetings, written agreements and actions to resolve the war in Darfur, the Sudanese conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile (both regions[1]) as well as the armed conflicts in Central, Northern and Eastern Sudan. [1] Sudan`s interim government and several rebel groups have signed a peace agreement aimed at resolving years of war that have left hundreds of thousands dead and millions displaced in different parts of the country.

The signatory parties must now strive to implement the provisions of those agreements as soon as possible in order to achieve lasting peace in all parts of the country and to promote reconciliation among all Sudanese. Kiir also thanked the international community for its ”support and encouragement” in mediating the agreement and stressed that ”our work is not finished and we will not relax until our efforts for a peaceful region are achieved.” He warned the outside world that Sudan ”needs his help and help.” Sudanese researcher Eric Reeves said he was skeptical that Hemetti was ”ready to make peace,” arguing that Hemetti was responsible for crimes against humanity and genocide during the wars in Darfur and South Kordofan. [27] On September 3, 2020, an agreement was reached in Addis Ababa between the transitional government and the SPLM-Nord-Al-Hilu rebel group to separate religion and state and not discriminate against anyone`s ethnicity in order to ensure equal treatment of all citizens of Sudan. . . .